Nanoparticle Technology Licensed to Vaccine Development Firm

Post Date: July 19, 2021

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From left: Xi Jason Jiang, PhD, and Ming Tan, PhD

Cincinnati Children’s has licensed a novel virus-like particle vaccine platform to a local biopharmaceutical company, which states that developing the technology has the potential to create next-generation vaccines.

Researchers from the Division of Infectious Diseases bioengineered nanoparticles and polymers that are easily produced, stable and immunogenic, according to Blue Water Vaccines Inc., the Cincinnati-based firm that licensed the technology.

Blue Water intends to apply the technology to developing a universal vaccine for influenza and a novel, dual vaccine for norovirus and rotavirus.

“The platform utilizes nanoparticle delivery technology that may have potential broad application to develop vaccines for multiple infectious diseases,” Blue Water stated in a news release. “The platform leverages norovirus capsid proteins to present foreign antigens for immune enhancement.”

Cincinnati Children’s investigators Xi Jason Jiang, PhD, and Ming Tan, PhD, said: “We have been working in infectious diseases research for a combined six decades. This milestone represents an important step toward reaching patients in need.”

Joseph Hernandez, CEO of Blue Water Vaccines, said the company is excited to collaborate with the experts at Cincinnati Children’s.

“We look forward to growing our pipeline with the novel platform to pursue the dual norovirus/rotavirus vaccine and to further develop our influenza program,” Hernandez said.

“Additionally, we also hope to leverage the platform to further expand our business development initiatives with prospective collaborators that may wish to pursue the development of both individual and adjunct therapeutics based on this unique platform,” Hernandez said.

Read more about technologies at Cincinnati Children’s at Innovation.CincinnatiChildrens.org.

Read more about P-particle research at Cincinnati Children’s 

Download PDF of Research Horizons article, Winter 2014