Most-Shared Findings of January 2020

Post Date: January 30, 2020

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These brain images of 12-year-old children show regions of the brain in red, orange and yellow that are most affected by traffic related air pollution (TRAP). Those regions denote a reduction in cortical thickness linked to elemental carbon attributed to traffic. Of these images, the darker the color, the stronger the effect. The study appears in PLOS One.

These findings published in January 2019 from investigators at Cincinnati Children’s were the most-shared by news media and fellow scientists on social media.

Reduced gray matter volume and cortical thickness associated with traffic-related air pollution in a longitudinally studied pediatric cohort. Article in PLOS One, January 2020.

Co-authors from Cincinnati Children’s and the University of Cincinnati include: Travis Beckwith, PhD, Kim Cecil, PhD, Mekibib Altaye, MD, Christopher Wolfe, MS, Zana Percy, MS, Thomas Maloney, MA, Kimberly Yolton, PhD, Grace LeMasters, PhD, MSN, Kelly Brunst, and Patrick Ryan, PhD, MS.

Adaptive Thermogenesis in Mice Is Enhanced by Opsin 3-Dependent Adipocyte Light Sensing. Article in Cell Reports, January 2019

Senior author: Richard Lang, PhD. Co-authors from Cincinnati Children’s and the University of Cincinnati include: Gowri Nayak, PhD, Kevin Zhang, BS, MS, Shruti Vemaraju, PhD, Yoshinobu Odaka, PhD, April Smith, MS, Brian Upton, BS, Shane D’Souza, BS, Minh-Thanh Nguyen, PhD, Rajib Mukherjee, PhD, Gang Wu, PhD, Robert Schmidt, BS, Xue Mei, PhD, Nathan Petts, BS, Matthew Batie, BA, John Hogenesch, PhD, Takahisa Nakamura, PhD, and Joan Sanchez-Gurmaches, PhD.

A Roadmap to Emotional Health for Children and Families With Chronic Pediatric Conditions. Article in Pediatrics, January 2020.

Cincinnati Children’s co-authors: Thomas Boat, MD, and Carole Lannon, MD, MPH