Can Regulating Metabolites Prevent Breast Cancer Recurrence?

Post Date: September 6, 2022

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From left: Susan Waltz, PhD, and Susanne Wells, PhD

A team of scientists from the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s reports in a study published Sept. 6, 2022, in PLOS One that managing cancer-related metabolic changes in the body may offer a novel path for preventing breast cancer from returning after diagnosis.

The study reflects the latest outcome of a 15-year collaboration between UC’s Susan Waltz, PhD, and Cincinnati Children’s Susanne Wells, PhD. Both research groups have been studying the oncogenes Ron and DEK. Both genes are independently associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients.

“Our metabolism is ever-changing based on how we are designed genetically and also based on what we ingest and are exposed to,” says Wells, director of the Epithelial Carcinogenesis and Stem Cell Program at Cincinnati Children’s and a member of the University of Cincinnati Cancer Center. “And cancer cells love a certain metabolism that is called a cancer metabolism and promotes cancer formation and spread.”

Read more about the study

 

 

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The Research Horizons blog features news and insights about the latest discoveries and innovations developed by the scientists of Cincinnati Children's. This blog does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.